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News from and about Toby Nixon


Kirkland City Councilman Toby Nixon announces re-election bid

by ROB BUTCHER

     Kirkland Councilmember Toby Nixon announced today that he will seek re-election to the Kirkland City Council.
     “I see a bright future for Kirkland, and to build that future we need a city government that is fiscally responsible, encouraging to local businesses, and open and accountable to our citizens” said Nixon. “I’ll continue using my experience, knowledge and skills, honed as your city council member, as a representative in the state legislature and as a fire commissioner, to serve you in building Kirkland’s tomorrow.”
     “I am firmly committed to ensuring that citizens are never surprised by actions taken by the city. You have a right to participate in establishing the future policies of our city and to clear and fair notice when changes are proposed. Kirkland is already an example of openness and accountability and I will continue to work to ensure our city does an even better job being open, transparent and accountable to our citizens,” continued Nixon.
     ...

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Kirkland City Councilman Toby Nixon announces re-election bid

by MATT PHELPS, Kirkland Reporter Regional Editor

     Kirkland (May 8, 2015) -- Toby Nixon announced May 8 that he will seek re-election to the Kirkland City Council. Nixon currently hold position 4 on the council and was first elected in 2012.
     “I see a bright future for Kirkland, and to build that future we need a city government that is fiscally responsible, encouraging to local businesses, and open and accountable to our citizens,” Nixon said in a relase. “I’ll continue using my experience, knowledge and skills, honed as your city council member, as a representative in the state legislature and as a fire commissioner, to serve you in building Kirkland’s tomorrow.”
     Nixon in on the Public Safety Committee, Disability Board, Public Works, Parks and Human Services Committee, and he is the Chair of Tourism Development Committee. He is also a former state representative from the 45th Legislative District and commissioner of King County Fire Protection District 41.
     ...

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Kirkland business community reacts to bag ban

by TJ MARTINELL, Kirkland Reporter Reporter

     Kirkland (January 8, 2015) -- The Kirkland City Council voted to approve a proposed ban on most plastic bags at city businesses, despite a 2013 survey of residents that showed overwhelming opposition. The ban prohibits single-use plastic bags while allowing exemptions for plastic bags such as those used for transporting bulk food, hardware items, frozen foods, meats and newspapers. It also requires retail stores to charge customers at least a five cent fee for recyclable paper bags.
     The new policy is scheduled to go into effect on March 1, 2016. It is estimated that the new regulation will affect approximately 170 retail businesses in Kirkland.
     ...
    The only councilmember to vote against the ordinance was Toby Nixon, who has voiced opposition to the idea of a plastic bag ban from the beginning.
     ...

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Kirkland City Council member, former fire commissioner responds to union

by TOBY NIXON

     Kirkland (January 8, 2015) -- One of Bryan Vadney’s jobs as president of the local firefighters union is to maximize the number of firefighters hired, apparently without regard for whether it is in the city’s overall best interests and without balancing the cost against other important priorities.
     It’s thus not surprising for him to come in at the last minute of a two-year station siting process claiming that geography is irrelevant, more firefighters are really the answer, and to have “lost confidence” in management who made recommendations based on actual response time and call data.
     What is surprising and disappointing, however, is escalating that to stirring up public concern about quality of service, pitting neighborhood against neighborhood, and twisting and selectively using facts, such as the following:
     ...

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Kirkland Councilman Toby Nixon completes AWC leadership training program

by KIRKLAND REPORTER STAFF

     Kirkland (December 26, 2013) -- Kirkland City Councilman Toby Nixon recently received a Certificate of Municipal Leadership from the Association of Washington Cities for completing over 30 hours of training credits. The leadership program is designed to enhance the ability of elected municipal officials by providing knowledge and skills to effectively operate within the law, plan for the future, secure and manage funds and foster community and staff relationships.
     ...

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Kirkland residents concerned about potential power lines on Rose Hill

by RAECHEL DAWSON, Kirkland Reporter Reporter

     Kirkland (December 23, 2013) -- With the Seattle City Light power lines already laced throughout the South Rose Hill neighborhood, many Kirkland residents can’t imagine having more power lines in the area.
     But there could be.
    ...
     Nonetheless, Councilman Toby Nixon is a strong believer in preserving as many trees as Kirkland can, as is the Council.
     “They have to clear quite a swath,” Nixon said. “I don’t know the exact width but I imagine it’s 100-feet wide. If you look at the western edge of Bridle Trails State Park, that’s going to be a huge amount of trees.”
     Nixon said city staff is in the process of gathering more information on the environmental impact, as well as which city-owned facilities would be impacted by the potential route.
     Personally, Nixon said he was concerned with the transmission line’s electromagnetic interference and how it would affect TV, radio and Wi-fi reception for nearby residents.
     ...

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Washington coalition recognizes Kirkland for open government

by KIRKLAND REPORTER STAFF

     Kirkland (September 23, 2013) -- The Washington Coalition for Open Government recognized the Kirkland City Council during the Sept. 17 meeting for its recent adoption of records retention rules and procedures.
     The Coalition’s board of directors voted unanimously to present its Key Award to the city of Kirkland in recognition of the city’s adoption of its comprehensive and innovative new public records ordinance and rules.
     ...

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Kirkland Councilman meets with sister city mayor in Germany on his own dime

by CARRIE RODRIGUEZ, Kirkland Reporter Reporter

     Kirkland (September 10, 2013) -- Kirkland Councilman Toby Nixon was impressed that a street that runs through Germany is named after Kirkland – Kirklandstrasse.
     But the street naming wasn’t a coincidence.
     Emmerich is Kirkland’s sister city in Germany and Nixon recently met with the mayor there during a personal vacation.
     Mayor Johannes Diks and Nixon met for almost an hour on Aug. 21, focusing on the sister city relationship and how to increase its value to both cities.
     ...

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Kirkland raises transparency bar with new public disclosure rules | Toby Nixon

by TOBY NIXON

     Kirkland (July 29, 2013) -- Open and transparent government is essential to liberty, and access to public records is a key element of open government.
     As an advocate for government transparency and accountability, as well as a Kirkland City Council member, I believe that the council placed the city on the cutting edge of public records access by its recent unanimous adoption of two pieces of legislation.
     Ordinance O-4414, “Access to Public Records,” and Resolution R-4987, “Public Records Act Rules,” will govern how Kirkland handles public records requests going forward.
     They define open processes for establishing the level of resources allocated to public records access within the context of the overall city budget, for public reporting of the performance of city staff on handling records requests, and for how records requests will be managed, tracked and completed using a system of online queues of pending and active requests and logs of completed requests.
     Together, these processes make the records access service itself more transparent to the public. The logs and queues will be available on the city’s website by Nov. 1.
     Kirkland has elevated the city service of providing access to public records to “first class” status like other essential city services, requiring that the handling of public records requests be evaluated and funded as part of all future budget deliberations by the city council. The ordinance and rules create a performance management system for records requests, with goals and performance metrics like every other essential city service.
     The ordinance and rules shine a light on how the city is performing on records requests, giving the public and the council tools to know whether additional resources are necessary to meet public expectations of responsiveness to requests.
     Just as importantly, they put the public records service in the appropriate context of all of the other essential services that a city provides such as public safety, environmental protection, human services and infrastructure investments. Budget allocations for records requests will be evaluated along with these other critical services so that all city services receive a reasonable allocation of resources based on citizen priorities.
     As with other essential services, spikes in demand for access to public records will be fulfilled within the constraints of allocated resources and spread over time when necessary to avoid interference with other services.
     This approach respects both the right of the people to access their records and their right to receive other essential city services, at a level of performance they expect and can afford.
     By adopting this ordinance and resolution and following through with the required oversight, the council fulfills our commitment to the people of Kirkland to use the resources they provide as efficiently and effectively as possible, to provide the services they need and expect and to merit their trust and confidence.

     Toby Nixon is a member of the Kirkland City Council.

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Kirkland should not mandate participation in Section 8 | Toby Nixon

by TOBY NIXON

     Kirkland (March 4, 2013) -- I grew up in a poor family. My dad was disabled in a work accident when my two brothers and I were very young, breaking all the bones in both his feet. There was no workers compensation insurance then. My dad could never again find steady work.
     My mom couldn’t deal with the setback, so she left us. My brothers and I grew up on welfare, food stamps, government surplus food, Medicaid, and rental housing assistance. I got my first job in the computer field thanks to the CETA program. I know from personal experience how helpful these programs are to those in need.
     One of the things I learned early on is that not every store accepts food stamps, not every health care provider accepts Medicaid, and not every landlord accepts rental vouchers. I learned later in life that the same is true of programs like WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) and DSHS-funded child care, adult family homes and nursing homes.
     Participation by vendors is voluntary for all of these programs, and many choose to not participate. And why is that? If the proponents of Kirkland’s proposed Section 8 mandate are correct and it is simply a question of “method of payment,” then why would any business or property owner turn down an additional customer and a reliable payer?
     The simple fact is that it is not just a question of “method of payment.” Those health care providers, stores, landlords, day care providers, AFH and nursing home operators, and others who choose not to participate in those programs are not discriminating against poor people on the basis of “method of payment.” They are declining to participate in those programs because of all the other strings that are attached to such participation.
     In some cases, the “strings” are limitations on reimbursement rates. In others, the “strings” are government inspections, or government reviews of pricing, contracts, leases, policies, internal controls and decisions.
     In every one of these programs, in exchange for accepting government funding or subsidies, the government imposes a number of additional requirements, limitations, and restrictions on the vendors who participate. These extra rules can be intrusive, complicated and burdensome. And that is exactly why these programs are designed to be voluntary.
     Business and property owners should be able to choose whether or not they want to accept additional government regulation in exchange for expanding their pool of potential customers. Not everyone wants to take that deal, and a city should not force them to do so when both the federal and state governments have declined to do so.
     If Kirkland can mandate participation in Section 8, what other state and federal programs can we mandate? Could we mandate that all stores in the city accept WIC and food stamps, all health care providers accept Medicare and Medicaid, all nursing homes and adult family homes accept DSHS patients, and all child care facilities accept DSHS clients?
     Where is the line to be drawn? I think it is best to draw the line at not locally mandating participation in any such state or federal program.
     The proponents of mandating acceptance of Section 8 vouchers claim to be for increasing housing diversity and making it easier for people who work in Kirkland to also afford to live in Kirkland.
     But what if the mandate causes apartment developers to build outside Kirkland, property owners to raise their rents in order to escape intrusive government oversight, or owners to sell their property and take it off the rental market entirely? All of these reduce the availability of affordable rental properties rather than increase it.
     Our city should not jump into mandating that all property owners accept Section 8 vouchers. What we should do first is implement an expanded educational effort, in conjunction with the King County Housing Authority, to inform property owners of the opportunity for participation in Section 8 and to help them navigate the bureaucracy when they choose to participate.
     Only after such an educational effort has been tried and failed should we even consider a mandate. But, my personal experience with these programs notwithstanding, I’m convinced that a mandate is not and never will be a good idea.

     Toby Nixon is a member of the Kirkland City Council. His comments above reflect his own position on this issue and do not necessarily reflect the positions of other council members or city staff.

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2012 FOI Hero Award Winner Announced

by NATIONAL FREEDOM OF INFORMATION COALITION

     COLUMBIA, Mo. (April 6, 2012) — Toby Nixon, president of Washington Coalition for Open Government (WCOG) and a city council member in Kirkland, Washington, has been selected for induction into Heroes of the 50 States: The State Open Government Hall of Fame for 2012.
     The National Freedom of Information Coalition (NFOIC) and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) announced Nixon’s selection jointly today. The State Open Government Hall of Fame, begun in 2003, was developed by national leaders of SPJ and NFOIC to recognize the contributions made by open government advocates in individual states.
     This year’s formal induction ceremony will take place on Saturday, May 12, at a luncheon during the 2012 FOI Summit at the Madison Concourse Hotel and Governor's Club in Madison, Wisconsin, hosted by NFOIC and the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council.
     Nixon, who also served in the Washington state House of Representatives from 2002 to 2006, is only the second elected official to be selected for the State Open Government Hall of Fame.
     During his time as a Washington legislator, he sponsored 13 bills supporting more open government and also served as a ranking member of the House Committee on State Government Operations and Accountability, which under his leadership passed 17 election reform bills.
     “Toby is the twelfth overall inductee since the ‘Heroes’ Hall of Fame was begun, but only the second elected official chosen,” said Kenneth F. Bunting, executive director of NFOIC. “Government works better, and people in Washington state are more informed, because of Toby's work as a legislator, as a municipal official and as an extremely hard-working and dedicated officer of WCOG.”
     Nixon was nominated by the WCOG, the state member organization of NFOIC for which he has served as president since 2007. During his time at WCOG, he has built the organization into one of the most effective state coalitions in the country. The organization played an instrumental role in the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Doe v. Reed, which affirmed a lower court ruling that disclosure of the identity of petition signers does not violate the First Amendment. WCOG has also filed nine amicus briefs to support other open government cases in Washington Appellate Courts, tracked over 75 bills in the Washington State Legislature, and significantly expanded public outreach by hosting an annual Washington State Open Government Conference.
     Fighting numerous appeals and court cases to ensure the release of the public records, Nixon’s hard work in the Doe v. Reed case paid off when in November, 2011, the records were finally released to the public.
     Induction into The State Open Government Hall of Fame signifies the “long and steady effort to preserve and protect the free flow of information about state and local government that is vital to the public in a democracy.”
     A committee that includes a representative of SPJ, a representative of NFOIC, and at least one additional at-large member evaluates all nominations. Each year, judging commences after Sunshine Week in mid-March. To ensure the integrity of the process, judges only become known to each other in the latter stages of the judging process.
     The judges who reviewed nominees for the Hall of Fame award this year were: Charles N. Davis, an associate professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and former executive director of NFOIC; Mike Farrell, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Kentucky and the director of the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center; and Tony Pederson, professor and Belo Distinguished Chair in Journalism at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.
     Farrell said, “Anyone who aspires to be an open government hero should meet Toby Nixon and learn his story. He has lived government transparency as a public official and invested countless hours of his life as a private citizen advocating, strategizing and involving others in efforts to keep government accountable to voters.”
     Davis adds, “Toby Nixon is the embodiment of citizen involvement in FOI. He has, despite an incredibly busy schedule, stepped up time and time again and furthered the cause of government transparency in Washington State. The coalition there is a testament to his prowess as an organizer, and government in the state is more open thanks in no small part to his volunteerism.”
     Nixon has been praised for his coalition building as well as his successes as an open government advocate. Tony Pederson remarks, “Toby Nixon is a treasure for the state of Washington for his extraordinary focus on freedom of information. His efforts over an extended period of time have involved working at every level of government and with numerous constituencies to build consensus on the importance of transparency and open government.”
     In recognition of his commitment to open government and public information issues, Nixon also won the 2006 Freedom’s Light Award from the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, and he served on the Washington Open Government Task Force, an organization created by the Washington Attorney General to address concerns about violations of open government laws. In addition to his work as a city council member and an open government advocate, Nixon is a 35-year computer industry veteran, working on the Windows group at Microsoft.
     Nominations for this award are made to honor individuals who have shown a substantial and sustained commitment to open government and freedom of information issues at the state and local level.
     The most recent inductees to the State Open Government Hall of Fame include: John R. Finnegan Sr., chairman emeritus of the Minnesota News Council and president of the Minnesota Joint Media Committee; Robert J. Freeman, executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government; and Mitchell W. Pearlman, executive director emeritus of the Connecticut Freedom of Information Commission and a director of NFOIC.

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Kirkland City Council passes code of ethics

by MATT PHELPS, Kirkland Reporter Regional Editor

     Kirkland (February 8, 2012) -- After two years of research, debate, committees and council discussions the Kirkland City Council unanimously approved a code of ethics.
     “It’s been a two-year process and we are happy that it is done,” said Councilman Toby Nixon.
     The council voted to approve the code of ethics Tuesday during its regularly scheduled meeting. Nixon was an instrumental figure in crafting the code of ethics, serving as the chair of the ethics task force prior to his election to council.
     “As you know, I am kind of in love with this,” joked Nixon. “I have spent a lot of time on this.”
     ...

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Kirkland City Council elects new deputy mayor, new members take oath

by MATT PHELPS, Kirkland Reporter Regional Editor

     Kirkland (January 4, 2012) -- The newly elected members of the Kirkland City Council were sworn in Tuesday night at City Hall, with Toby Nixon becoming the first council member from the newly annexed neighborhood of Kingsgate. But the biggest surprise came as the members chose a new deputy mayor to help lead the council.
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Kirkland Council members Sternoff, Nixon and Asher to take ceremonial oath

by KIRKLAND REPORTER STAFF

     At the Jan. 3, 2012 Kirkland City Council meeting, Council members Bob Sternoff (Position No. 2), Toby Nixon (Position No. 4), and Dave Asher (Position No. 6) will take a ceremonial Oath of Office administered by City Municipal Court Judge Michael Lambo.
     Kirkland residents are invited to the ceremony that begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 123 5th Avenue. Also at this meeting, the council will select a Mayor and Deputy Mayor who will serve through Dec. 31, 2013.
     ...

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Kirkland City Council: The Times recommends Sternoff, Nixon and Asher

by SEATTLE TIMES EDITORIAL BOARD

     Seattle (October 19, 2011) -- The city of Kirkland grew by 31,000 residents with the annexation of Finn Hill, Juanita and Kingsgate. The Kirkland City Council has the duel challenge of fully integrating its new neighbors and taxpayers into the state's 12th largest city, while maintaining the community's beloved small-town feel.
     Knitting those areas into the city poses challenges that will require enthusiasm and deft political handling. Toby Nixon, who is challenging the Position 4 incumbent, brings both. The Kingsgate resident worked for the annexation as co-chair of Citizens for One Kirkland; incumbent Jessica Greenway was the lone council vote against annexation.
     Nixon is a seasoned leader with extensive local and statewide connections as a former state representative, former fire district commissioner, chairman of the Kirkland Ethics Task Force and president of the Washington Coalition of Open Government.
     ...

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Kirkland City Council candidate profile: Toby Nixon for Pos. 4

By MATT PHELPS, KIRKLAND REPORTER STAFF WRITER

     Kirkland (October 19, 2011) -- For many voters experience is a big factor when choosing a candidate. Many who enter city council races for the first time have experience in the business community, as a part of a non-profit or have served on a board or two. But that experience is limited and most have not served in government. Toby Nixon has all of this and then some.
     “I say yes to too many people,” joked Nixon, who was a state representative for two-and-a-half terms for the 45th District, which includes Kirkland. “I am involved in eight different non-profit organizations right now … Should I be elected to the city council I will clearly need to reduce my level of involvement in some of those. But I love to be involved.”
     Nixon was asked by many to consider a run for city council after working as the co-chair of the Annexation YES! Committee.
     “I thought hard about it, it wasn’t an automatic yes because I am involved in so many activities,” said Nixon, who is running against Councilwoman Jessica Greenway for Position 4. “But ultimately I decided it was the right thing to do.”
     Nixon is also the president of the Washington Coalition for Open Government.
     ...

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Toby Nixon calls on Kirkland Councilmembers to keep their word on utility tax rate for customers of Northshore Utility District

Toby Nixon, candidate for Kirkland City Council, addressed the Kirkland City Council at their meeting on Tuesday, September 20, offering these remarks regarding the utility tax rate to be charged customers of Northshore Utility District, and also regarding the proposed garbage collection rate increase.

     Mayor McBride and members of the Council, I am Toby Nixon, and I live in the Kingsgate neighborhood. My family and I receive water and sewer service from Northshore Utility District.
     During the annexation campaign, we were told that we would be required to pay taxes on our utilities that we hadn’t had to pay in the unincorporated area, but that the utility taxes would be balanced by reductions in our property taxes. We were specifically told that the utility tax rate would be ten and a half percent. Many people depended on that representation when voting to support annexation.
     Now we hear that the effective tax rate is not going to be ten and a half percent, but almost thirteen percent, on Northshore utilities. This isn’t fair. It isn’t right. It isn’t how we build trust. The city should stick to what the people in the annexation area were told, especially so soon after the annexation effective date. I ask you to please change the way the utility tax is calculated for public utilities operating in the city so that it is based on actual billings, or some other mechanism consistent with what new residents were told.
     I also want to comment on the proposed garbage collection rate increase. I want to be sure you are aware that one of the reasons many customers in the annexation area “downsized” from large toters to smaller sizes is that Waste Management simply delivered the small sizes without even asking customers if that’s what they wanted.
     Let me tell you what happened at our house. It was our understanding that when service changed from Allied Waste to Waste Management, we would receive the same size toters we had with Allied, unless we specifically requested something different. That didn’t happen. Our two 96 gallon toters from Allied (which we need because eight adults live at our house) were replaced with one 35 gallon toter from Waste Management. We had to call twice to get the large toters we wanted. Many of my neighbors had the same experience -- smaller toters were delivered than what they previously had, even though they never requested downsizing.
     Waste Management knew what the effect on rates would be if many customers used the smaller toters, so I’m not surprised that smaller toters were delivered even though they weren’t requested. Just something to consider before you lock in this proposed rate increase.
     Thank you.

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Toby Nixon calls on King County Councilmembers to Vote NO on the Metro license tab tax increase

Toby Nixon, candidate for Kirkland City Council, sent the following message individually to each member of the King County Council:

Dear Councilmember,

I urge you to vote NO on the proposed $20 tax increase on motor vehicles to subsidize Metro bus service.

Metro complains that their fuel and labor costs have increased, and that they need a “temporary” tax increase while they find new “sustainable” revenue sources. The fact is, families throughout King County are struggling with cost increases of their own and have had to cut back significantly on their spending. They have seen huge increases in their cost of gas, food, and sewer service, among other things. Many families are barely making ends meet or are going further into debt every month, and do not have the ability to just reach into the pockets of their neighbors and take money to close the gap as Metro proposes to do.

It is morally reprehensible for us to lay more taxes on the backs of the poor and needy in our community so that we can continue providing cheap bus rides for doctors, lawyers, businessmen, and senior government employees to get to their high-paying jobs in downtown Seattle. Those who ride the bus as a convenience at the expense of taxpayers already save hundreds of dollars a month on the cost of fuel, parking, vehicle maintenance, insurance, and, soon, tolls, and shouldn’t be subsidized further. It’s time we stopped providing taxpayer-funded bus fare subsidies to people who can afford to pay the full cost of the service they receive and who would still be saving money while doing so.

Instead of piling more Metro taxes on the poor, we should raise Metro bus fares to the level necessary to cover the full operation and maintenance cost of the system. We could then use existing Metro tax dollars for targeted subsidies only for those who truly need it, by issuing vouchers to those who qualify that can be applied to purchasing discount bus passes, rather than subsidizing everyone who rides the bus.

Best regards,

Toby Nixon

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Toby Nixon Speaks About Kirkland's Future at Campaign Event

By ROB BUTCHER, KIRKLAND VIEWS EDITOR

     Kirkland (June 15, 2011) -- On Tuesday morning, Kirkland City Council candidate Toby Nixon spoke before a group of enthusiastic supporters gathered for a campaign breakfast held in the gymnasium of the Kirkland Boys and Girls Club. Nixon, a former State Representative for the 45th District and former Commissioner for Fire Protection District 41, is challenging incumbent Jessica Greenway for her seat on the Kirkland City Council.
     After introductory comments by several local and regional politicians including King County Councilmember Jane Hague, Nixon first thanked his family and friends for their support before addressing the audience. In speech, Nixon discussed several issues facing the citizens of Kirkland.
     ...

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Former Legislator Toby Nixon to Challenge Jessica Greenway on City Council

By GREG JOHNSTON, KIRKLAND PATCH EDITOR

     Kirkland (May 9, 2011) -- Former state legislator Toby Nixon, who lives in an area that will officially become Kirkland when annexation takes effect June 1, announced Monday he will run against Jessica Greenway for City Council.
     Nixon said he had filed with the state Public Disclosure Commission to run for Kirkland City Council Position 4. Greenway, the incumbent, announced in April that she would run for re-election.
     Three council positions will be contested on the Nov. 8 ballot: the one held by Greenway and those held by Dave Asher and Bob Sternoff. Neither Asher nor Sternoff has announced his intentions.
     ...

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Toby Nixon announces candidacy for Kirkland City Council

     Kirkland (May 9, 2011) -- Former State Representative Toby Nixon announced today that he will seek election this year to the Kirkland City Council. He has filed as a candidate for Position 4, currently held by Jessica Greenway.
     “Our city is at a crossroads,” Nixon said. “To build the Kirkland we want for tomorrow, we need city government today that is fiscally responsible, encouraging to local businesses, and open and accountable to our citizens. I’ll work to build Kirkland’s tomorrow.”
     Nixon is an experienced and active leader in our community. He serves as a commissioner of King County Fire Protection District 41, which provides fire and emergency medical service to the Kingsgate, North Juanita, and Finn Hill areas in cooperation with the Kirkland Fire Department. As state representative for the 45th District from 2002 to 2007, he represented many of the citizens of Kirkland in Olympia.
     A consistent advocate for transparency and ethics in government, Nixon chaired the Kirkland Ethics Task Force, appointed by the city council to draft an ethics and conduct policy for members of the city council and city boards and commissions. He also serves as president of Washington Coalition for Open Government, a statewide non-profit non-partisan organization that educates citizens and public officials regarding access to public records and meetings.
     “I want Kirkland to be an example of openness and accountability to cities throughout Washington, and go beyond the minimal basic requirements of state law on government transparency and ethics,” said Nixon. “We need a strong ethics code now, so we don’t repeat the problems we’ve seen in Bellevue and other cities, and comprehensive policies on disclosure to ensure citizens have access to public records promptly and cost-effectively. We have a right to know what our city officials are doing, and to expect them to serve the public interest and not personal or political gain.”
     Nixon supports a healthy local business climate, and has been recognized as “Government Partner of the Year” by the Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce and “Guardian of Small Business” by the National Federation of Independent Business. “We need jobs and businesses in Kirkland to grow if we expect the best services for our neighborhoods and families,” said Nixon. “Our business regulations, zoning, and tax policies must accommodate innovation and growth, while protecting the unique character of Kirkland and our neighborhoods.”
     Nixon co-chaired Citizens for One Kirkland, the committee that supported annexation of Kingsgate, North Juanita, and Finn Hill into Kirkland. “I’m looking forward to my neighborhood finally being a part of the city of Kirkland on June 1. I’ve worked toward this goal for nearly a decade, unlike some on the city council who tried to block it and voted against it,” said Nixon. “I’m committed to bringing all parts of our city together, building a sustainable budget, and providing the essential services that the citizens and businesses in Kirkland deserve and expect.”
     Nixon has been an active supporter of improving education and aiding the young people in our community through their challenges. He’s a member of the advisory councils of both the Lake Washington Schools Foundation and Youth Eastside Services, and a former board member of YES.
     Nixon, 52, is a senior program manager in the Windows Ecosystem Engagement Team at Microsoft, assisting in developing technology standards strategies, representing Microsoft in national and international organizations, and promoting Microsoft technology initiatives to industry partners. He’s been with Microsoft and lived in Kirkland since 1993. He and his wife Irene have five children ages 18 to 26.
     For more information, visit www.TobyNixon.com.

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